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Wedding Bands

January 2nd, 2012 | Posted by DJ Antonius in Uncategorized

DJ, Band or iPod?  Part 2…

 

How can the couple see or build the song library?

DJ
Ask the DJ if he can email you an Excel or PDF file listing all the music in his library.

Band
Ask the band to provide a demo that includes live recordings of the band’s performances. We have several MP3s on our MySpace music page as well.

iPod
Sit down together and reminisce about important moments in your relationship. Are there songs that remind you of your first kiss, your vacations together? If you know what kind of genre you’re going for, check some websites for playlists.

Who emcees the reception?

DJ
The DJ usually emcees, but sometimes a bride may bring her own MC, or a guest or family member may want to take charge and make the announcements.

Band
Different areas have different practices, and the bandleader only emcees if the bride requests. Sometimes a bride provides her own MC; sometimes she hires one in the wedding locale; sometimes she asks someone in the band to emcee.

iPod
Since no one is being paid to emcee the reception, you’ll have to put one of your guests to work. Maybe you have an outgoing aunt who’s the life of the party or a funny groomsman who’d be comfortable making announcements. This guest will also have to cue the important songs at the right times. Be sure to go over all of their responsibilities with them in advance.

How can a couple make sure the band or DJ has their essential songs?

DJ
At least two weeks prior to the wedding, I ask my clients for a playlist that includes special dances and favorite artists, genres and songs. Even if your DJ doesn’t ask you for this info, you should pass it along with plenty of advance notice.

Band
Make sure to provide the band with these songs, either on a CD or by email. It’s also critical that the bride discuss and decide with the band beforehand whether she wants these songs played live by the band, played by a DJ (if any) or simply played on an iPod through the band’s sound system.

What’s the cost typically?

DJ
Professional DJs run from about $800 to $1,500 for a standard four-hour reception. To trim costs, ask if the DJ is willing to be contracted for less time.

Band
There’s no typical cost, though bands tend to be more expensive than DJs. Hiring a band is like buying anything else — you get what you pay for; the best bands will cost from $1,500 to $2,500 per hour. Costs can be cut by negotiation.

iPod
Playlists are by far the cheapest way to go. When bought alone, MP3s generally cost 99 cents each, but full albums are usually discounted. You’ll need between 75 and 100 songs to cover a standard reception, so look for compilation albums (Amazon offers deals of select full albums for under $5). Also check music stores in your area for gently used CDs at discounted prices.

What are your tips for a flawless night of dancing?

DJ
Playing music your party will respond to is key. Look at your guest list to gauge your crowd — what are their ages, where do they come from, are there more girls or guys, etc.

Band
Make sure the band has a great repertoire and entertaining vocalists with strong communication and interaction skills. A band that gets the audience to participate in the performances livens up the party.

iPod
Your guests might not like the same music you do, so pick a good mix of songs, with something for everyone. Also have a backup iPod on hand; that way, if one goes kaput, you’re still covered. The night before, fully charge the batteries for both. Lastly, plan at least five hours’ worth of music, and have at least two playlists ready: one for background dinner music and the other to get the dancing going.

What trends do you see?

DJ
Pop music is hotter than ever; even hip-hop artists are moving to this genre.

Band
In order to leave more time for dancing and enjoying the band, brides are moving the toasts and formalities (cake-cutting, bouquet toss, etc.) to the dinner hour, instead of before or after the meal.

iPod
One of my fave trends is the hybrid first-dance song. The couple starts off slow-dancing to a traditional song, and then it surprisingly changes into a more upbeat, fun track. Bonus if the bride and groom have unique choreography!

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